The Best Workouts in Scottsdale

The Best Workouts in Scottsdale
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There is no shortage of ways to burn calories and all of them claim to be the best, so I set out to find the best workouts in Scottsdale. I believe that it’s smart to switch your routine now and then, too.

Much of my exercise regimen orbits around being better at mountain and road biking. My goal is to be light but powerful, more soccer player than swole bro. (Most male cyclists look like praying mantises, and I don’t dig that look. I also don’t find it functional, and I love being able to try whatever sport I want.) I like learning stuff that I can use during my home workouts. Even though I can and do train independently by myself, I like training with other people, too.

best workouts in Scottsdale
Not the goal. Nope.

OK, onto the list. WARNING: Everyone gets a grade. You might think my grade is too low — and that’s fine. I’m evaluating based on my own preferences and biases, which lean more toward actual real weights and creative use of bodyweight. If it’s an A for you and a C- for me, that might just mean we have different goals and requirements. This is an evolving effort that I plan to update. If you have a suggestion, throw it my way in the comments.

TruHIT Reigns for Current Best Workouts in Scottsdale

I took my first TruHIT class back in September. The equipment in the studio mirrors a lot of what I have at home: kettlebells, Olympic bars (which are rarely used in class), medicine balls, box jumps and jump ropes. Truhitt also has a few things I don’t, such as TRX rigs, rowing machines, dumbbells and stretchy bands.

The TruHIT staff combines this all in some creative ways. Different days throughout the week focus on different goals, such as legs, upper body and general conditioning. Personally, I opt for the leg days. Leg muscles and glutes are your biggest muscles, and they burn a lot of calories.

During my time there, I’ve found that that variety is pretty good. The staff is friendly and helpful, and the other participants are also a good bunch. There’s a lot of mutual encouragement, but not in the showy, bro-y, over-the-top way you might see at other gyms. You can borrow quite a bit for your home workouts, and I also like the scale/scanner thing in front that helps track your weight, metabolic age, body fat percentage and other data points.

best workouts in scottsdale
Good for tracking your progress

Is there any room for improvement? I find the TRX exercises involving stretchy bands kind of meh. Some of the exercise variations can be a bit much. A bit of simplifying and streamlining could reduce the “am I doing this right?” factor. I wouldn’t mind some specific classes for more technical movements like squats and deadlifts.

Overall, though, I find TruHIT to be the place to beat for the Best Workouts in Scottsdale title. A drop-in class is $15, and you can also go for monthly unlimited classes or get passes for a certain number of classes. Also good to know: They have a kids area where the staff will keep an eye on your little people for $5.

Grade: B+

Eat the Frog For Odd Hours

This studio is pretty interesting. They provide a heart-rate monitor for you, and you can see your status in real time on the monitors. Also noteworthy: Eat the Frog has other classes that don’t have instructors. You do your workout based on what’s on the monitors. That gives them some interesting flexibility with their hours.

Eat the Frog involves some quality time with a rowing machine. (This photo wasn’t taken at Eat the Frog.)

I did a drop-in class that focused on core movements. It started off with a warm-up on the rowing machines, where the instructor encouraged us to hit certain heart-rate target zones.

I’m not a huge fan of core-focused classes. It’s a relatively small muscle group, and I’m really into compound movements. Eat the Frog does not seem at all suited to people who dig basic but hard movements like squats, deadlifts and pullups.

That said, my core did get a good workout. And I never object to time on a rowing machine. That’s a quality way to get stronger and leaner.

Ultimately, Eat the Frog is not for me. It’s not a bad workout, but I don’t see it building power the way I’d like. I also do find a lot of the exercises a bit gimmicky being the back-to-basics guy I am. Packages range from $80-$150 a month. They also have a “punch card” sort of setup, but I didn’t get pricing for it.

Grade: C+

Fitwall: A Bit Funky

I’m always up for something a bit oddball in my quest to find the best workouts in Scottsdale. So I gave Fitwall a shot. I went during one of their leg days. The sessions revolve around a slatted metal wall where might do leg exercises or ersatz pullups.

best workouts in Scottsdale
A look inside the Fitwall facility.

Sigh. Man. Fake pullups. I get it. Pullups are hard — damn hard. Most people can’t do ‘em. But this wall idea does absolutely zero to get anyone close to a pullup. There is no substitute for a real pullup bar and struggling like crazy to do just one, single, solitary pushup.

During the session at Fitwall, I also used resistance bands and some light dumbbells. I would’ve happily traded them for heavier ones and doing fewer reps. But in all honesty, I am probably not the Fitwall model user. I see this as a workout for people who don’t really have much background in exercise. They’ll burn some calories and tone up a bit. I could also see a serious competitive bodybuilder using some of these exercises to hit smaller muscle groups. (Talk about use cases at opposite ends of the spectrum!)

There are some group exercise classes that seem to involve actual weights, but those take place in a different room. The pricing structure is a bit opaque: The website says they have plans from $7 a class. This morning, they tried to lure me in via text with an offer for $29 for two weeks.

I passed on the offer. I don’t see myself getting what I need out of Fitwall. It’s too gimmicky and focused mainly on proprietary equipment. People newer to training won’t really get enough out of it to independently build their own fitness routine. Unfortunately, I think that’s the goal of many fitness studios. That’s not a knock on the staff members, who were uniformly welcoming and helpful.

Grade: C-

Sweating at Hot Yoga University

I’ve already written a full review of Hot Yoga University. I’ve been going there a long time, and they’ve actually gotten better over time. They now have these HotFIIT and IronSculpt classes, and they are pretty serious stuff. The IronSculpt classes even use some dumbbells. They’re light, but you’ll definitely feel the burn after a few rounds.

best workouts in scottsdale
Hot Yoga University is the yoga studio we all need.

That said, I consider Hot Yoga classes more of a supplement for me. Others with different goals might be fine relying on these as their go-to workouts (even though some yoga folks probably get upset at those of us who think of yoga as a workout).

As for Hot Yoga University itself, it’s reasonably priced ($10 drop-in classes can’t be beat!) and considerably more friendly than many other yoga studios. Some people might be seeking more muscle mass and explosive power. Hot Yoga University can’t provide that alone, but it is absolutely great stuff for those who have other weightlifting routines in their fitness routine.

Grade: B

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Comments

  1. Appreciate you checking out the class at Fitwall. I’ll hook you up with a free week on me (the owner) so you can get a better feel for what the PROGRAM entails, vs what a single 40-minute class was like. I always find it comical when someone makes a judgement about a program as a whole based on a small sample.

    Side note, the assisted pull-ups, guaranteed to help with upper body pull strength and endurance (even if not hanging).

    You came during an iso>rep workout that builds a specific quality, but was not a heavy day. Again, a small sample. We work towards building multiple strength qualities, not only low rep heavy weight…yes, partly because the majority of people need to build that quality first, but also because they tend to be best for injury prevention and aesthetics. Heavy heavy lifting is GREAT, but in our plan it is performed in the smaller classes with more time to ensure excellent mechanics.

    Lemme know!

  2. Thanks for the offer, Clifton. Fitwall is not in the cards for me. You may find it “comical” that I made that conclusion after one session. If you look at a more macro level, though, I made that assessment based on thousands of workouts, soccer games, hockey games, races, rides, runs, hikes and whatnot that came before I ever heard of Fitwall. One of the things I’ve learned is that there is no one-size-fits-all fitness solution that will meet everyone’s needs — I tried to make that point in the blog post. There are some people who will find exactly what they want at Fitwall. I’m just not one of them. Likewise, most of your clientele would probably run screaming out of a place like Thorbecke’s. 🙂 There’s a place for everyone, and we’re not all the same.

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